Searning for Miró and Picasso in Chicago

The art of conversation. Birds do it, bees do it. Even small and large cities do it. That’s right. All sorts of things engage in conversation.

In the 1960’s, the city of Chicago decided to talk to Barcelona. With two commissions from Barcelona’s famous artistic sons, Chicago bragged to the world about her relationship with modernism and stature as a major city. In Daley Plaza, also known as Daley Center, you can find two large sculptures from the famous Catalans.

Miró's Chicago

Miro’s Chicago in Daley Plaza

 

The Chicago Picasso

The Chicago Picasso in Daley Plaza

 


Note:

  • Miro’s Chicago was originally called The Sun, the Moon and One Star.
  • In June 2014 I had the honor to travel to Barcelona, Spain and participate in The Creativity Workshop as a part of an educator fellowship called Fund for Teachers. At the workshop our leaders, Shelley Berc and Alejandro Fogel, talked to us about some great artists from Barcelona. They also told us that two artists, Pablo Picasso and Joan Miro, had famous sculptures in Chicago. As it turned out, I was traveling to Chicago the following month to participate in a week-long seminar hosted by the Chicago Architecture Foundation and funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.
  • I was so excited to get a picture of the Miro when no one was around.

*****

FFT LogoMy fellowship to Barcelona was possible because of Fund for Teachers. If you are a teacher in the United States and you have an amazing idea for professional growth, please consider completing an application. Even if you aren’t funded, the application process is worth it.

2 thoughts on “Searning for Miró and Picasso in Chicago

    • I didn’t either until my two fellowships. I thought it was so cool that they were across from each other. Chicago has a lot of public art and buildings that “speak” to other cities & artists. It is such a cool city.

      Thanks for reading.

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